Egg Season and a Recipe

Spring is the time when the chickens are flush with eggs and I’m always looking for ways to use them up. This recipe is quick and nutritious.

Easy Quiche

Ingredients

  • 1 refrigerated pie crust
  • 6 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup milk or cream
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 cup cooked ham chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups shredded cheese divided
  • 3 tablespoons green onions

 

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Unroll pie crust and press into a 9″ pie plate, crimping the top edges if desired.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, salt and pepper.
  4. Sprinkle ham, 1 cup of cheese, and green onions into the pie crust and pour the egg mixture over top. Sprinkle remaining 1/2 cup cheese on top of egg mixture.
  5. Bake for 35-40 minutes until the center is completely set. Let cool for 5-10 minutes before slicing and serving.

 

This is a versatile recipe, you can add just about anything you want.  We like it with feta, precooked bacon and spinach with cheddar sprinkled on top.  Also, I make my own crusts but if you use a pre-made crust you can have dinner in the oven in minutes.  Serve with a salad and dinner is nutritious and quick.  If you have leftovers, cool the quiche for up to two hours on the counter, and then refrigerate. To reheat, cover the quiche with foil and bake for about at 325F (until just heated). Cooling it before refrigerating helps keep the crust a bit more crisp

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Lambing During a polar vortex

It’s finally warmed up enough that I can start moving ewes and lambs around. We’ve been overflowing inside and it’s time to move outside. These groups are moving from the heated shop to the unheated barn. Lyle will be happy to have his shop livestock free again.

Looks like our break in lambing is over. Had a set of twins yesterday and looks like the rest of the ewes are starting to bag up. They had to wait for the next cold snap I guess 🤦‍♀️

Sourdough

What new things do you want to learn this year? I’ve got a long list of things I want to do but I’m afraid I won’t live long enough to try them all 😂

I’ve always wanted to learn to make sourdough bread so I took the plunge after New Years and made some starter from scratch. It took about 8 days before I had it ripe enough to try baking with it. The results were palatable but not very airy. I think I’ll keep feeding the starter and try again in a few days. I’m taking a sourdough workshop with Ashley at Saltine Baking Company this February, can’t wait to learn from the best sourdough baker I know. 😁

Parsnips!

It’s parsnip season! Now that we’ve had a few frosts it’s time to start digging up these delicious root vegetables.

My new favourite way to eat them is mashed with potatoes. I boil equal amounts of Yukon gold potatoes and parsnips until tender. Mash with butter and cream or milk. It’s a nice twist to regular mashed potatoes. What’s your favourite way to cook them?

We’ve got them available at the farm road stand and will have them Saturday at Regina Farmers’ Market Cooperative.

Preserving the Food You Grow

Preserving the food you grow is a great thing to do. But it’s so import that you follow safe practices when doing so. Just because grandma did it one way it doesn’t mean that you should. Bacteria and toxins morph over time and require safer canning techniques. I’m on a few fb canning sites and can’t believe the dangerous information that’s shared. The best advise I can give is to get yourself a current copy of the Ball Book of Home Preserving. All recipes have been tested safe for home canning. The link also provides pertinent info. Happy canning! 👩‍🌾

://www.healthycanning.com/home-canning-in-canada/

Rosie Cotton

Whatcha doing Rosie? 👩‍🌾

Oh, you know, just hanging out with my sheep 🐶

The bonding process is coming along between our new livestock guardian pup and her charges. To be an effective guardian she will live with the sheep full time protecting them from all predators. It’s a lengthy process due to the slow maturation of the dogs, taking up to two years.

Harvest

The first cut hay crop is almost done now that the humidity is lower and the hay will actually dry now. Another couple hours to finish up baling then we can start hauling hay from the field and stacking it. The first 400 bales are in and it’s a good feeling to start filling the quonset. 👩‍🌾